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dc.contributor.authorDeneke, Getaneh Yohannes
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-21T12:57:00Z
dc.date.available2019-01-21T12:57:00Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://dspace.unza.zm/handle/123456789/5625
dc.descriptionThesisen
dc.description.abstractThe study sought to establish whether deaf students in tertiary education in Zambia have access to sign language services. Participants were drawn from the University of Zambia, Ministry of Community Development, Mother and Child Health, Zambia Institute of Special Education and Ministry of Higher Education. Four objectives guided the study: namely i) investigate the accessibility of Sign Language interpreting services to deaf students in tertiary institutions; ii) establish the benefits of Sign Language interpreting services to deaf students at tertiary education level; iii) explore the challenges in the provision of Sign Language interpreting at tertiary level; iv) establish measures that had been put in place to ensure sustainability of Sign Language interpreting services in tertiary institutions. The study employed the qualitative methods and a case study research design. Study sample comprised twenty six: nine (9) deaf students, nine lecturers, four sign language interpreters, two administrators and two policy makers, one from Ministry of Higher Education and one from Ministry of Community Development, Mother and Child Health was used. The data was obtained through interview schedules, observations and documentary analysis guides. Data were coded and emerging themes were grouped into categories using thematic approach. The study revealed that deaf students had limited access to Sign Language interpretation service. There is a shortage of SLI in terms of quantity and quality as ZAMISE had one interpreter and UNZA had two to service the whole school population. Lack of job security, specific policy on SLS, poor conditions of service and working conditions, remuneration were some of constraints established. Enhancement of high academic competiveness, academic performance, classroom interaction and participation were some of notable benefits derived from SLS. The study recommended the need for enhancement of professionalism in SLS delivery through manpower development and training, formulation of a policy solely on Sign Language, the use of Total Communication at tertiary level and recognition of SLI as a profession by government and all stakeholdersen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Zambiaen
dc.subjectSign language--Study and teaching--Zambiaen
dc.subjectSign language--Study--Teritary education--Zambiaen
dc.titleAccessibility of sign language services to the deaf in tertiary education institutions: a case of the University of Zambia and Zambia Institute of special educationen
dc.typeThesisen


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