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dc.contributor.authorPhiri, Andrew M
dc.contributor.authorChota, Amos
dc.contributor.authorSikasunge, Chummy Sikalizyo
dc.contributor.authorMusukwa, Martha N.
dc.contributor.authorHaazele, Felix
dc.contributor.authorPhiri, Isaac K.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-26T12:50:35Z
dc.date.available2019-02-26T12:50:35Z
dc.date.issued2009-08-12
dc.identifier.issn11250-009-9432-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://dspace.unza.zm/handle/123456789/5795
dc.descriptionJournal articleen
dc.description.abstractVillage chickens play vital roles in the livelihoods of those people keeping them. Backyard poultry provide a critical source of food and income for people in developing countries (Lans et al. 2007) and so is the case in Zambia. However, their productivity has been hampered by many constraints resulting in low flock sizes (Kusina and Kusina 1999). Among the constraints is the problem of external and internal parasites (Abebe et al. 1997). In Africa, the control of these parasites is limited by the high cost of anthelmintics, their uncertain availability and the increasing frequency of drug resistance (Naidoo et al. 2008). Therefore, possible alternatives such as the use of plant products that function by mechanisms other than those of chemotherapeutics, with the additional advantage of a natural origin have been recommended (Naidoo et al. 2008). Besides, the cost of treatment with alternative traditional methods (herbs) is negligible when compared with the cost of conventional medicines. In addition to being very inexpensive, herbal preparations have good medicinal value (Mbaria et al. 1998). Therefore, in a quest for provision of safe animal products, a number of studies on use of herbal therapy especially in poultry, have been conducted many of which have reported a number of herbal products that are of potential use as therapeutic or prophylactic agents against bacteria (Arshad et al. 2008), protozoa (Nweze and Obiwulu 2009; Naidoo et al. 2008; Arshad et al. 2008) and viruses (Kong et al. 2006). However, only a few herbal products (Lans et al. 2007; Purwati and He 1991) have been reported to be potential antihelmintic agents in poultry. The objective of the current study was to compare the efficacy of Carica papaya latex with that of piperazine in the control of nematode parasites in village chickens as well as assess the effect of treatment on productivity (weight gain).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Scienceen
dc.subjectCarica papayaen
dc.subjectChickenen
dc.subjectHelminthsen
dc.subjectHerbal therapyen
dc.subjectPiperazineen
dc.titleA comparative study of the efficacy of piperazine and Carica papaya for the control of helminth parasites in village chickens in Zambiaen
dc.typeArticleen


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